Unless the Grain of Wheat Dies, it Remains Alone

Very truly I tell you, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds. (Jn.12.24 NIV) The immediate previous context of this verse has Gentiles inquiring of Jesus’ Disciple Philip asking to speak with Jesus. No record exists that their request was fulfilled. Instead, Jesus indicates to Philip and … Continue reading Unless the Grain of Wheat Dies, it Remains Alone

Part 3: The Servant’s Burial according to the Scriptures

This article with its Hebrew Language analysis will be difficult for many laymen to follow. Here is the upshot: The earliest witness to Is. 53.9 comes from The Great Isaiah Scroll, the only virtually complete book of the bible found as part of The Dead Sea Scrolls. This text is between 950 and 1150 years older than our previous earliest record: the Leningrad Codex of … Continue reading Part 3: The Servant’s Burial according to the Scriptures

Ignatius, Polycarp, and the Pauline Authorship of 1 and 2 Timothy

Page from Codex H (015) at 1 Tim 2.2-6 (6th Century)I recently read an older article in the academic journal Vigiliae Christianae that argues for Polycarp’s belief that 1 and 2 Timothy were written by Paul. Kenneth Berding, “Polycarp of Smyrna’s View of the Authorship of 1 and 2 Timothy,” Vigiliae Christianae 53.4 (Nov., 1999): 349-360.Here… Ignatius, Ploycarp, and the Pauline Authorship of 1 and 2 Timothy … Continue reading Ignatius, Polycarp, and the Pauline Authorship of 1 and 2 Timothy

Divine Providence and the Problem of Innocent Suffering

This world is as it is because it is a battlefield between Good and Evil. The Manichees were half right but wholly wrong. The battle is real, but they thought the two opposing forces were both eternal and equally ultimate. Milton teaches us better. Even Satan knows that God alone is Almighty. No creature can overcome his will. There may be two sides, but one … Continue reading Divine Providence and the Problem of Innocent Suffering

Do We Still Believe in Sola Scriptura?

Here is an article by Sam Waldron with which I substantially agree. The early centuries of Christian development were mainly marked with fighting aberrant doctrines of the deity. However, some doctrines these Christians failed to appreciate. They, for lack of a better word, perverted the mode and meaning of baptism, along with The Lord’s Supper. From the scriptures, it is clear to see both Christian … Continue reading Do We Still Believe in Sola Scriptura?

You’re a Pastor, Not a Therapist

We need to also help people see another perspective, God’s. Therefore, we need to get to know folks and their experiences and guide them to see themselves in God’s redemptive context. This is a better approach than being cold and distant. We cannot just say: repent or perish. This seems like a balanced approach to assisting people find God’s truth. You’re a Pastor, Not a … Continue reading You’re a Pastor, Not a Therapist

The Danger of Free-Floating Biblicism

Christians today need to read their bible with the Church of yesteryears. Between the 2nd and 5th centuries there arose a number of Christological Heresies that were confronted by faithful Christians who grappled with these errors. These Christians exegeted the scriptures and developed an accurate understanding which has stood the test of time. While Historic Christian Theology is unlike O.T. prophetic revelation, the Church Fathers … Continue reading The Danger of Free-Floating Biblicism

The Mount Ebal Lead ‘Curse’ Inscription in Late Bronze Age Hebrew: Some Methodological Caveats

Christopher Rollston (rollston@gwu.edu) George Washington University, Professor of Northwest Semitic Languages and Literatures, Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. _ Setting the Stage: Some sensational claims were made in a press conference on March 24,… The Mount Ebal Lead ‘Curse’ Inscription in Late Bronze Age Hebrew: Some Methodological Caveats — Rollston Epigraphy Continue reading The Mount Ebal Lead ‘Curse’ Inscription in Late Bronze Age Hebrew: Some Methodological Caveats

A Firestorm in the Desert

Paul was a tentmaker as well as a Rabbi both before and after his Christian conversion. These tents, most likely, were Jewish pilgrimage tents that Grecian and other Diaspora 1st century Jews used to “appear before the Lord” at one of the three yearly feasts at Jerusalem. Jerusalem’s population would swell during these festivals and yet little or no evidence remains today of these festival … Continue reading A Firestorm in the Desert

How Should Christians Think about History?

A few days ago, I wrote a review on Vern Poythress’ new book about how Christians should approach history. He has posted a nice summary of the contents which is far superior to my meager thoughts of his book. I recommend the book highly. This post however, doesn’t even mention this larger work. Hopefully, this synopsis will whet the appetite to more fully think about … Continue reading How Should Christians Think about History?

Religious Nationalism is a Problem for the Right and Left

Since the 2016 presidential election of Donald Trump, the term “Christian nationalism” has gained wide exposure and claimed much attention in American culture. Christian nationalism has come to serve as a theory of everything for all that is wrong with America. And if we heed the voices emanating from progressives, any form of religious nationalism… Religious Nationalism is a Problem for the Right and Left — … Continue reading Religious Nationalism is a Problem for the Right and Left