Botching Bostock — Analogical Thoughts

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, ruled in a 6-3 decision that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against their employees on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The Court’s opinion was written by Justice Gorsuch… via Botching Bostock — Analogical Thoughts Continue reading Botching Bostock — Analogical Thoughts

Two kinds of leaders—Mark 10:42-45

  I’m going to talk about two kinds of leaders in Mark 10:42-45, but the discussion will make fullest sense if I spend some time in the rest of Mark’s Gospel setting the stage for this. Jesus throughout Mark’s Gospel displays one kind of leadership. Some scholars like to play Jesus’s “Messianic secret” (his invoking silence… via Two kinds of leaders—Mark 10:42-45 — Bible BackgroundBible Background Continue reading Two kinds of leaders—Mark 10:42-45

Stuck in the Mire of Our Love for this World — Tim Challies

Earlier this week a friend asked where he should start in reading Calvin’s Institutes. I suggested, as I often do, beginning with Calvin’s A Little Book on the Christian Life which is an excerpt of the larger work, and one focused largely on Christian living. Here’s a wonderful and timely extract from the new edition… via Stuck in the Mire of Our Love for this World … Continue reading Stuck in the Mire of Our Love for this World — Tim Challies

King Ahab: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

In our series of bioarchaeographies, we’ve alternated between Old Testament people, such as Tiglath-Pileser III, Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus, Shishak, King David, Ahaz, Hezekiah, and Omri, and New Testament figures, like Caesar Augustus, Quirinius, Herod Agrippa I and II, Herod Antipas, Pontius Pilate, Gallio, and Sergius Paulus. In this article, we’ll explore the life of one of […] via King Ahab: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading King Ahab: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Fake Artifacts

The Forger Among Us: The Museum of the Bible Dead Sea Scrolls and the Recent History of Epigraphic Forgeries Prof. Christopher Rollston (Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University) rollston@gwu.edu Dept. of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations George Washington University On March 13, 2020, the Museum of the Bible held a symposium in Washington, D.C. … via The Forger Among Us: The Museum of the Bible Dead … Continue reading Fake Artifacts

King Omri: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

During the period in Jewish history known as the Divided Monarchy, the formerly united Hebrew nation split into to two kingdoms: the kingdom of Israel in the north and the kingdom of Judah in the south. In our series of bioarchaeographies, we explored the lives of King Ahaz and King Hezekiah of Judah; we now […] via King Omri: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading King Omri: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Herod Antipas: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

When Herod the Great died, his kingdom was divided among his sons by Caesar Augustus. Herod Antipater, better known as Antipas, was granted the right to rule Galilee and Perea. He was given the title of Tetrarch (“ruler of a quarter”), although he was sometimes known as King Herod, as his father had been (Mk […] via Herod Antipas: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading Herod Antipas: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Agrippa II: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

In our next bioarchaeography we’ll be exploring the life of the last Herodian King: Herod Agrippa II. With five different Herods mentioned in Scripture (not to mention a couple of Philips who may also have born the name Herod) it can be difficult to keep them straight, so here’s a quick summary: Herod the Great […] via Agrippa II: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading Agrippa II: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Shishak: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

It seems fitting that, having explored the lives of Hebrew, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian kings, we should now consider an Egyptian Pharaoh. While many Pharaohs in the book of Genesis are not named, following the convention of Moses’ day, later Pharaohs in Scripture are named, following the convention at the time of later authors.1 One […] via Shishak: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading Shishak: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Paul’s Letter Carriers Tychicus And Onesimus — The Textual Mechanic

Ancient writings were largely circulated within communities through copying and distributing, with no legal copyright or formal system to control plagiarism. Once a work began to circulate the author became powerless to control the quality of the copying process or to select the audience that would read the work. The permanency of writing and the… via Paul’s Letter Carriers Tychicus And Onesimus — The Textual Mechanic Continue reading Paul’s Letter Carriers Tychicus And Onesimus — The Textual Mechanic

“God Repented” vs Greek Ontology

Above: An approximation of Parmenides’ “what is.” THE CONFLICT There is an ongoing conflict between Biblical studies and philosophical theology. N.T. Wright sums it up this way in his essay “Historical Paul and Systematic Theology”: “In a famous conversation between Paul Tillich and C. H. Dodd at Union Seminary in New York, Tillich basically said that […] via “God Repented” vs Greek Ontology — Colvinism Continue reading “God Repented” vs Greek Ontology

King David: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Our next bioarchaeography is about one of the most fiercely-debated figures in the Old Testament. Some scholars believe King David was more myth than man who, if he existed, was nothing more than a tribal chief, and certainly not the historical king of a dynasty in Israel. For example, University of Sheffield Professor, Dr. Philip […] via King David: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading King David: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Sergius Paulus: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

In our series of bioarchaeographies, we’ve been using archaeology to tell the life story of biblical figures. So far we’ve studied King Hezekiah, Pontius Pilate, Nebuchadnezzar, Gallio, and Tiglath-Pileser III. With each of these biblical characters, we’ve seen direct archaeological evidence that affirms their historicity as well as specific details in Scripture. Sometimes in archaeology, […] via Sergius Paulus: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report Continue reading Sergius Paulus: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

“Humane” Values and Christianity — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

I’m deep into Tom Holland’s latest book in which he argues at length that values that for many in the West are simply those of any humane, civilized person in fact are shaped heavily by the influence of Christianity: Dominion: The Making of the Western Mind (London: Little & Brown, 2019). Holland gave the gist of his […] via “Humane” Values and Christianity — Larry Hurtado’s … Continue reading “Humane” Values and Christianity — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

The Origins of Devotion to Jesus in its Ancient Context — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

(Several months ago, I was asked to write a contribution to a multi-author work on Jesus to be published in French, my contribution to deal with the origins of Jesus-devotion. I was given a word-limit, and so had to be brief. The result is something of a capsulized treatment of the matter. I post below […] via The Origins of Devotion to Jesus in its Ancient … Continue reading The Origins of Devotion to Jesus in its Ancient Context — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

Review of Berman, Inconsistency in the Torah — PaleoJudaica.com

REVIEWS OF BIBLICAL AND EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES:2019.3.4 | Joshua A. Berman. Inconsistency in the Torah: Ancient Literary Convention and the Limits of Source Criticism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. ISBN 9780190658809. Review by Lindsey A. Askin, University of Bristol.Excerpt:… We have always known the Pentateuch repeats itself but historically we have been less certain about… via Review of Berman, Inconsistency in the Torah — PaleoJudaica.com Continue reading Review of Berman, Inconsistency in the Torah — PaleoJudaica.com

“Scribal Harmonization”: A New Study — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

I commend a newly-published study of what is called “harmonization” of texts of the Gospels: Cambry G. Pardee, Scribal Harmonization in the Synoptic Gospels, NTTSD, 60 (Leiden: Brill, 2019). I have just completed a larger review for Review of Biblical Literature which won’t appear till November this year, but the book deserves to be noticed […] via “Scribal Harmonization”: A New Study — Larry Hurtado’s Blog Continue reading “Scribal Harmonization”: A New Study — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

Still Not Living in The Matrix

James Anderson has a PhD in computer simulation from the University of Edinburgh so he knows what he speaks about regarding this concept. To me the concept is purely atheistic since it denies the obvious creation, design, and word of God. However, Dr. Anderson explains using logic what the better solution is:   A couple of commentators on a previous post pointed me to an … Continue reading Still Not Living in The Matrix

Supersessionism?

Craig Keener identifies some of the ideas that has led many to think that membership in a certain group is salvific. A better reading of the Torah sees both authentic believers in Israel’s history alongside “wicked fools” (see 2 Samuel 13.13). For certain, the New Covenant replaces the Old Covenant but nowhere does the bible speak of a replacement of peoples. For sure God worked … Continue reading Supersessionism?

The Inherent Frustration of Trusting Modern Science for Ultimate Truth

By “Modern Science” I mean the Post-Enlightenment idea that man is the standard for explaining himself and his environment. It is as if reality is perceived only through the things that resister from his own sensors. If God cannot be seen or touched then He must not be there according to fallen man. We moderns are easily dazzled by discovery of knowledge and the making … Continue reading The Inherent Frustration of Trusting Modern Science for Ultimate Truth

“Pre-Existence” in Ancient Jewish Tradition and the NT — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

Larry Hurtado’s posts are succinct, incisive, clear, and filled with carefully studied positions. There is no “filler” in his writings. So, here is his latest post along with plenty of evidence to bolster his position.   One reader of my posts seems to have difficulty in grasping what scholars refer to as “pre-existence”. It’s a technical term, scholarly jargon/shorthand, to designate a motif or concept … Continue reading “Pre-Existence” in Ancient Jewish Tradition and the NT — Larry Hurtado’s Blog

Idols of a Mother’s Heart — Reformation21

If you’re a parent and a Christian, you’ve probably read your share of parenting books. Of the making of self-help parenting books, there is seemingly no end. If, like the writer of Ecclesiastes, you’ve been wearied by such study, Christina Fox’s new book, Idols of a Mother’s Heart, will be a balm for your soul.… via Idols of a Mother’s Heart — Reformation21 Continue reading Idols of a Mother’s Heart — Reformation21

When Mark Goodacre asked ‘Why not Matthew’s use of Luke?’ – SBL Denver 2018 — Alan Garrow Didache – Blog

Here is Goodacre on the Synoptic Problem and a response. I agree with the response and conclusion but do not think much of the “fatigue” theory of editing. (A review, by Robert K. MacEwen, of a paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature, 18 November 2018) It was standing room only in room 302 of the Denver Convention Center when … Continue reading When Mark Goodacre asked ‘Why not Matthew’s use of Luke?’ – SBL Denver 2018 — Alan Garrow Didache – Blog

Dibon and the Moabite (or Mesha) Stone — Ferrell’s Travel Blog

Here is another great installment from Farrell’s Travel Blog: Dibon is mentioned in the account of the defeat of King Sihon (Numbers 21:30), and was later built by the sons of Gad (Numbers 32:34). It is located in the “plain of Medeba [Madaba]” (Joshua 13:9), and is associated with Heshbon (Joshua 13:17). Upon the return from Babylon some of the sons of Judah lived […] via … Continue reading Dibon and the Moabite (or Mesha) Stone — Ferrell’s Travel Blog

Kh. Qeiyafa and Kh. al–Ra’i — Yosef Garfinkel Lecture — HolyLandPhotos’ Blog

IMHO — this is not to be missed! See the following. The Lanier Theological Library has posted a 72-minute video of an illustrated lecture by Yosef Garfinkel entitled “Searching for the Historical King David: Khirbet Qeiyafa and Khirbet al–Ra’i. Qeiyafa, in the Judean lowlands (=Shephelah), was excavated by him from 2007 through 2013 and is […] via Kh. Qeiyafa and Kh. al–Ra’i — Yosef Garfinkel Lecture … Continue reading Kh. Qeiyafa and Kh. al–Ra’i — Yosef Garfinkel Lecture — HolyLandPhotos’ Blog