The Roman destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 70 AD — Ritmeyer Archaeological Design

Yesterday was Tisha be’av, the Hebrew date on which the Jewish people remember the destruction of both the First and Second Temples. In honour of this occasion, Megalim, The City of David Institute for Jerusalem Studies, showed a dramatized recreation (2019) of the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD, called: A Temple in Flames…

via The Roman destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 70 AD — Ritmeyer Archaeological Design

The day after Tisha B’av — Ferrell’s Travel Blog

The phrase Tisa B’av may be strange to Christians, but it means the Fast of the Ninth. The observance “is a day of mourning to commemorate the many tragedies that have befallen the Jewish people” (Judaism 101). According to this source, five terrible events took place on or near the ninth day of the month […]

via The day after Tisha B’av — Ferrell’s Travel Blog

The Pool of Bethesda — Ferrell’s Travel Blog

The Pool of Bethesda is mentioned only once in the New Testament. At this pool Jesus healed a man who had been an invalid for 38 years. Now there is in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate a pool, in Aramaic called Bethesda, which has five roofed colonnades. (John 5:2 ESV) The pool consisted of two […]

via The Pool of Bethesda — Ferrell’s Travel Blog

Feelings Looking for Arguments

Evangelicals have been debating manhood and womanhood for decades, and the conflict shows no signs of subsiding. No little bit of ink is spilled every year by both sides, and many works have trouble getting through all the noise. Such is not the case with Aimee Byrd’s new book Recovering from Biblical Manhood & Womanhood:…

via A way-station to egalitarianism: A review essay of Aimee Byrd’s Recovering from Biblical Manhood & Womanhood — Southern Equip

Sennacherib: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

In our next bioarchaeography, we’ll be exploring the life of Sennacherib, King of Assyria, using archaeological remains. Sennacherib is mentioned by name 16 times in Scripture, more than any other Assyrian ruler. From a biblical perspective, he is most famous for his invasion of Judah in 701 BC and his siege against King Hezekiah and […]

via Sennacherib: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Is God Judging the World? How the Book of Revelation Explains Our Crises — Desiring God

ABSTRACT: Are our current crises God’s judgment on the world? The answer to that question depends on the meaning of the word judgment. Crises such as the coronavirus may not be specific judgments against specific people for specific sins, but neither are they mere “natural disasters.” According to the book of Revelation, calamities like hurricanes,…

via Is God Judging the World? How the Book of Revelation Explains Our Crises — Desiring God

“Growing Like Hell,” Tulsa, 1921 — The Scriptorium Daily

The King’s Business, the monthly magazine of the Bible Institute of Los Angeles, published a strongly worded editorial in its September 1921 issue. With the arresting title, “Growing Like Hell,” managing editor Keith L. Brooks described the violence that had taken place in Tulsa, Oklahoma during the summer of ’21. Brooks’ editorial is short and…

via “Growing Like Hell,” Tulsa, 1921 — The Scriptorium Daily

Botching Bostock — Analogical Thoughts

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, ruled in a 6-3 decision that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against their employees on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The Court’s opinion was written by Justice Gorsuch…

via Botching Bostock — Analogical Thoughts

Two kinds of leaders—Mark 10:42-45

 

I’m going to talk about two kinds of leaders in Mark 10:42-45, but the discussion will make fullest sense if I spend some time in the rest of Mark’s Gospel setting the stage for this. Jesus throughout Mark’s Gospel displays one kind of leadership. Some scholars like to play Jesus’s “Messianic secret” (his invoking silence…

via Two kinds of leaders—Mark 10:42-45 — Bible BackgroundBible Background

Stuck in the Mire of Our Love for this World — Tim Challies

Earlier this week a friend asked where he should start in reading Calvin’s Institutes. I suggested, as I often do, beginning with Calvin’s A Little Book on the Christian Life which is an excerpt of the larger work, and one focused largely on Christian living. Here’s a wonderful and timely extract from the new edition…

via Stuck in the Mire of Our Love for this World — Tim Challies

King Ahab: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

In our series of bioarchaeographies, we’ve alternated between Old Testament people, such as Tiglath-Pileser III, Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus, Shishak, King David, Ahaz, Hezekiah, and Omri, and New Testament figures, like Caesar Augustus, Quirinius, Herod Agrippa I and II, Herod Antipas, Pontius Pilate, Gallio, and Sergius Paulus. In this article, we’ll explore the life of one of […]

via King Ahab: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Israel Research Trip, Post #6 — DrBarrick.org

Jezreel The meaning of “Jezreel” (יִזְרְעֶאל, yizre’e’l; LXX Ιεζραελ) appears to be either “God sows” or “may God make fertile/fruitful.” Jezreel sits opposite Shunem (1 Samuel 28:4; 2 Kings 4:8–10) and near halfway between Megiddo and Bethshan/Beth-shean with each being about ten miles distant from Jezreel. The junction of the Via Maris and the Way…

via Israel Research Trip, Post #6 — DrBarrick.org

175. Why Evangelicals Must Engage Roman Catholicism — Vatican Files

For missiological, theological, evangelistic, and strategic reasons, Evangelicals must engage Roman Catholicism in today’s world. L’articolo 175. Why Evangelicals Must Engage Roman Catholicism sembra essere il primo su Vatican Files.

via 175. Why Evangelicals Must Engage Roman Catholicism — Vatican Files

Judah’s Captivity 597 BC; the Babylonian Chronicles — Leon’s Message Board

Some of my current studies include 2 Kings 24-25, which tell of the reigns of Judah’s last three kings: Jehoiakim (r. 609-597 BC), Jehoiachin (597 BC), and Zedekiah (597-586 BC). For so long down to that point in time, God’s people had repeatedly turn to idols, such as Baal (other names included Teshub, Hadad, etc.), […]

via Judah’s Captivity 597 BC; the Babylonian Chronicles — Leon’s Message Board

Agrippa I: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

We’ve learned about two of the Herodian Rulers in our bioarchaeographies thus far: Herod Agrippa II, who was the ruler before whom the Apostle Paul made his defense in Acts 25-26, and Herod Antipas, who killed John the Baptist (Mt 6:17) and interviewed Jesus before his crucifixion (Lk 23:9). In this archaeological biography, we’ll explore […]

via Agrippa I: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Inspecting Isaiah 53

In the past few weeks and months, ancient biblical texts have made their way into major news outlets. Recently, National Geographic revealed that all of the newly discovered “Dead Sea Scrolls” in the Museum of the Bible’s collection are forgeries. On the New Testament side, there was much made of a sensational “First-Century Mark Fragment”…

via The resurrection really happened: textual criticism and Easter — Southern Equip

Origen: Comparing his Manuscripts to Jewish Copies — The Textual Mechanic

In the midst of discussing a textual reading at John 1:28 in his “Commentary on John” Origen of Caesarea (ca. 184 – 253 CE) waxed long on the various place names found in the Gospel accounts and the variations in spelling that can be seen in the manuscript tradition.“We are aware of the reading which…

via Origen: Comparing his Manuscripts to Jewish Copies — The Textual Mechanic

Exact Biblical Fulfillment

At least on a metaphorical level. After the Fall in Eden, the man, woman, and the serpent all stand judged at God’s tribunal. At this judgment scene the curse upon the serpent features two prophecies: 1. The Seed of the woman would crush the serpent’s head (This is future since Heb. 9.28 says a second appearance for salvation). 2. The serpent would pierce the heal of the Seed of the woman.

One of the few artifacts indicating Roman crucifixion shows a heal bone with an iron nail still embedded. This is how the prophecy of Gen. 3.15 was fulfilled. The people reading this  text probably were only aware of vipers instead of constrictors, and so would reason a fatal bite. It was. Gen. 3.15 also implies a resurrection since the crushing is after the harvest at the end of the age.

 

It is well–known from literature that the Romans crucified rebels and criminals. In 1968, an ossuary (bone box; see below) was found, among others, in a tomb in north Jerusalem in which were the bones of a 28 year old man and those of a child. A 4.3 inch nail penetrated the right heel bone […]

via Crucified Man from Jerusalem — HolyLandPhotos’ Blog

Devil Cast Out, Your Name Written in Heaven (Luke 10. 17-20)

Jesus’s seventy or seventy-two disciples returned to him excited after Jesus sent them out on their mission. “Lord, even the demons are subjected to us by your name!” (10:17). Jesus will redirect some of their excitement, but before turning to that, let me make a brief comment on the seventy or seventy-two. A majority of…

via Even the demons submit—and your name is written in heaven (Luke 10:17-20) — Bible BackgroundBible Background

Selfie Righteousness

The title is not original with me but apt.

“You do you.” Perhaps there’s no phrase the captures our current cultural moment better. Back in 2015, Colson Whitehead of the New York Times Magazine, lamented this phrase, arguing that it “perfectly captures our narcissistic culture.” Indeed, it is hard to disagree. “You do you” embodies our culture’s commitment to personal fulfillment, self-actualization, and the…

via How a “You do You” Culture Has Made Us Vulnerable to the Coronavirus — Canon Fodder

The Book of Job’s Storyline

For most Christians (and others reading the bible) the book of Job is enigmatic. However, by meditating (reflecting on what the text says), readers can gain some insights about Job’s struggles and their own as well. Craig Keener offers one of the better summaries of the book of Job. Not always, or even often, does God explain all of His workings to us. He has, though, given us all we need now during our time in this life.

I often think painfully of godly students or friends who died quite young—for example, Caritha Clarke, Nabeel Qureshi, Aaron Nickerson, and most recently Brittany Buchanan Douglas. The news of these events made little sense to me emotionally, though I have confidence in each case that they are celebrating now; they made it to God’s throne…

via Job and his comforters, or: how not to do grief counseling — Bible BackgroundBible Background

Fake Artifacts

The Forger Among Us: The Museum of the Bible Dead Sea Scrolls and the Recent History of Epigraphic Forgeries Prof. Christopher Rollston (Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University) rollston@gwu.edu Dept. of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations George Washington University On March 13, 2020, the Museum of the Bible held a symposium in Washington, D.C. …

via The Forger Among Us: The Museum of the Bible Dead Sea Scrolls and the Recent History of Epigraphic Forgeries — Rollston Epigraphy

Interview at Ian Paul’s Blog — Evangelical Textual Criticism

Over at his award winning blog (it’s true), Ian Paul has interviewed me about Myths & Mistakes, why skepticism sells, and whether textual criticism is the geekiest of the NT subdisciplines. Thanks to Ian for having me.

via Interview at Ian Paul’s Blog — Evangelical Textual Criticism

King Omri: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

During the period in Jewish history known as the Divided Monarchy, the formerly united Hebrew nation split into to two kingdoms: the kingdom of Israel in the north and the kingdom of Judah in the south. In our series of bioarchaeographies, we explored the lives of King Ahaz and King Hezekiah of Judah; we now […]

via King Omri: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

A Preliminary Evaluation and Critique of Prosopological Exegesis — Southern Equip

The post A Preliminary Evaluation and Critique of Prosopological Exegesis appeared first on Southern Equip.

via A Preliminary Evaluation and Critique of Prosopological Exegesis — Southern Equip

Herod Antipas: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

When Herod the Great died, his kingdom was divided among his sons by Caesar Augustus. Herod Antipater, better known as Antipas, was granted the right to rule Galilee and Perea. He was given the title of Tetrarch (“ruler of a quarter”), although he was sometimes known as King Herod, as his father had been (Mk […]

via Herod Antipas: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Israel Research Trip, Post #1 — DrBarrick.org

Dr. Barrick’s post is informative, cogent, and better than anything I can come up with at the moment:

After one week of research on the ground in Jordan, we turned our attention to Israel for the next two weeks. On our first day, six of us drove a rented van south to the Negev and the Gulf of Aqaba. We went with two purposes in mind: (1) to visit the site of ancient…

via Israel Research Trip, Post #1 — DrBarrick.org

Agrippa II: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

In our next bioarchaeography we’ll be exploring the life of the last Herodian King: Herod Agrippa II. With five different Herods mentioned in Scripture (not to mention a couple of Philips who may also have born the name Herod) it can be difficult to keep them straight, so here’s a quick summary: Herod the Great […]

via Agrippa II: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

Shishak: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report

It seems fitting that, having explored the lives of Hebrew, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian kings, we should now consider an Egyptian Pharaoh. While many Pharaohs in the book of Genesis are not named, following the convention of Moses’ day, later Pharaohs in Scripture are named, following the convention at the time of later authors.1 One […]

via Shishak: An Archaeological Biography — Bible Archaeology Report